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Farmer’s Log – February 13, 2014

Finally, the cold has broken, and we’ve begun to see rain, even if it is just a drop of rain. It’s good for the plants and it’s good for this land. A temperate rainforest should, you know, have rain.

Our schoolyard market gardens are getting ready to start up in earnest! The seed order is in, the pots are ready to be filled, and we are gearing up for the season to begin. The crocuses have just come up and that is signaling that spring is on the way – it’s time and Fresh Roots is ready!

Field Poetry – February 13, 2014

Springtime flowers, in sunshine hours; populate the earth
I’ve seen those pussy willows, and the crocuses give birth
Our sleeves are up, our rain pants on, and we’re already on the go
We’re just waiting for our friends so we can start to grow
So join our band of carrots that are marching round the blocks
we’ll line up beets, and salad too for those who’ll buy a box
Our sign is out – so go sign up for a tasty summer treat
and support your schoolyard garden with a veggie you can eat

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Farmer’s Log – February 5, 2014

It’s been a cold day on the farm, but it has been sunny. The greens – spinach, mustard, arugula, parsley – are growing well, even with temperatures staying just below zero. As a result the vegetables are incredibly delicious. During colder days and nights plants release sugars into their cells, reducing the possibility of the plant freezing and making the vegetable sweeter. So bring on the cold!

Field Poetry – February 5, 2014

Hibernating’s easy when you’ve got a coat of fur
But for parsley growing in the cold – let’s just all say… “burrrr…”
This ain’t Quebec upon last check, but still this place is cold
And all our veggies want a place where they can all grow old
So take them home, and in a chrome, pot of boiling water
Chop them up; dine and sup a vegetable slaughter.