Black Hawthorn

CAD $5.00

Crataegus douglasii

Large deciduous shrubs or small tree up to 10 m tall with thorns up to 3 cm long. Was considered very useful for all sorts of tools. White flowers from May till June that attract butterflies.

Height2 – 10m

Edible: Y

MedicineY

Other Uses: Y

Poisonous: N

Soilany kind of soil and acidity

Watering: wet

Sun: prefers full sun but can be in partial shade

Usually found at: sea level to mid elevations south of Fort St. John, along watercourses and meadowland thickets.

Pollinators & wildlife: butterflies

Ornamental: white flowers from May till June

32 in stock

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Description

Crataegus douglasii

Large deciduous shrubs or small tree up to 10 m tall with thorns up to 3 cm long. Was considered very useful for all sorts of tools. White flowers from May till June that attract butterflies.

Height2 – 10m

Edible: Y

MedicineY

Other Uses: Y

Poisonous: N

Soilany kind of soil and acidity

Watering: wet

Sun: prefers full sun but can be in partial shade

Usually found at: sea level to mid elevations south of Fort St. John, along watercourses and meadowland thickets.

Pollinators & wildlife: butterflies

Ornamental: white flowers from May till June

 

Leaves: thick, leathery, 3-6 cm long

Flowers: white, saucer-shaped flowers in flat-topped clusters. Bloom in May and June, stinky.

Berries: clusters of small, blackish “apples” (haws) that wither quickly when ripe.

First Nations usesthe thorns of black hawthorn had many practical uses, including prongs on rakes used for catching herring, lances for probing boils, or for piercing ears, for fish hooks and for playing pieces for games. Black hawthorn wood is very hard and was fashioned into tool handles and weapons. A winter dance face paint was made from grease and hawthorn charcoal. the dry, seedy fruits were eaten by many coastal groups both fresh and dried, often with oil or grease. They were not highly regarded, however. The bark of black hawthorn was used to treat venereal disease, thin the blood, strengthen the heart, or reduce swellings, and it was used in steam baths. The Thompson and Okanagan peoples used the thorns to pierce ears. The Lillooet and Gitksan people made fish hooks from them.

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