Gooseberry, Wild

CAD $5.00

Ribes rotundifolium – STCWELCU’CWE’L (SECWEPEMC)

A much-branched, 3-5 ft. shrub with broadly rounded, palmately lobed leaves. The stems are firm with small spines at the nodes and bristly internodes. Small, tubular flowers occur in clusters and are green, sometimes tinged with red. A many-seeded berry follows.

Height: 2-3.5

EdibleY

Medicine: Y 

Other Uses: Y

Poisonous: N

Soil: Rich, rocky soils

Watering: Dry

Sun: Part shade

Usually found at: Moist thickets, meadows, forests, and open woodlands at low elevations

Pollinators & wildlife: Native bees, birds

Ornamental: Has interesting berries and pretty green leaves

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Description

Ribes rotundifolium – STCWELCU’CWE’L (SECWEPEMC)

A much-branched, 3-5 ft. shrub with broadly rounded, palmately lobed leaves. The stems are firm with small spines at the nodes and bristly internodes. Small, tubular flowers occur in clusters and are green, sometimes tinged with red. A many-seeded berry follows.

Height: 2-3.5

EdibleY

Medicine: Y 

Other Uses: Y

Poisonous: N

Soil: Rich, rocky soils

Watering: Dry

Sun: Part shade

Usually found at: Moist thickets, meadows, forests, and open woodlands at low elevations

Pollinators & wildlife: Native bees, birds

Ornamental: Has interesting berries and pretty green leaves

 

Leaves: Alternate, hairy, 2-6 cm wide with toothed margins. Somewhat heart-shaped and divided into three main lobes

Flowers: 5 green/brown petals in a bell-shape

Berries: Smooth-skinned, usually green

First Nations uses: The berries were often mixed with salal berries and boiled down to make cakes that could be stored for winter. The roots can be boiled and used to help relief cramps by rubbing onto the affected area. Newborn babies were bathed in boiled leaves by their grandparents so that they would grow up to be intelligent and obedient. The roots were also boiled with cedar rose roots and woven into rope and fishing weirs. On Haida Gwaii the sharp thorns were used for tattooing. Tattooing was a rite of passage, and in Haida society children were tattooed by their maternal aunties.

 

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